Moultrie Panoramic 150i Wins Top Camera Award

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Moultrie Products, LLC is proud to announce that the innovative Moultrie Panoramic 150i trail camera has garnered the top spot in the annual Game & Fish/Sportsman Magazine’s Reader’s Choice Awards for 2014.

“We are honored to be recognized by the readers of Game & Fish and Sportsman magazines” stated Vice President of Marketing for Pradco Outdoor Brands, John Skrabo. “Providing unique and innovative solutions to consumer needs is what drives our product development, and the Panoramic 150i is a great example of this innovation.”

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The Panoramic 150i incorporates three no-glow infrared motion sensors that cover an extremely wide 150 degree detection area. That illusive buck of a lifetime can now be captured within three times the area of any other game camera on the market. These features combined with a trigger speed of less than one second and a battery life of over 9,000 images, justifies the highest honors in this year’s Game & Fish/Sportsman Reader’s Choice Awards.

Game & Fish/Sportsman magazine’s queried their 400,000 monthly subscribers and e-newsletter recipients to vote on their favorite gear and equipment from 12 different categories in the hunting realm. The products that were voted on needed to have been introduced within the last 3 years. Nearly 3,000 avid hunters submitted their vote and when the dust settled, the Moultrie Panoramic 150i sat atop the highly competitive trail camera category for the 2014 season.

Company Description:
Moultrie is the most recognizable game management brand in the industry. Moultrie develops and manufactures feeders, spreaders, sprayers, scouting cameras, feed supplements and accessories for deer, turkeys, hogs and fish. With over 30 years of experience, Moultrie is an expert in game observation and management. Moultrie is a division of PRADCO Outdoor brands. You can visit Moultrie on the web at www.moultriefeeders.com.

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From Top to Bottom – The Hit List

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The Hit List’s Andy Morgan is Looking to Start the Season off Right in Colorado

Once again it’s an all new season on The Hit List presented by Moultrie. The excitement level is at an all-time high as Gerald Swindle, Andy Morgan and Chad Ritter crisscross the United States, to embark on another mission to fulfill this season’s hit list.

On this week’s episode of The Hit List presented by Moultrie, Andy Morgan is joined by New Breed Archery Co-Owner Grady Phillips as they head west to Colorado’s Louisiana Purchase Ranch. Follow Morgan and Phillips as they hike the trails of Colorado searching for their trophy elk and Mule Deer, using Moultrie game cameras to help plan their shot.

The Hit List presented by Moultrie – TV air times are: The Outdoor Channel – Tuesdays 8:00 p.m., Thursdays 1:30 a.m., and Fridays 3:30 p.m. All times Eastern Standard.

About The Hit List presented by Moultrie: Watch the stories of three vibrant personalities unfold as they devote their efforts and passions into pin-pointing trophy deer across the United States. The work doesn’t stop from the time food plots go in till the arrow exits the rest. Watch as they formulate strategies based on information fed to them from their game cameras provided by Moultrie. Join the personalities of Gerald Swindle, Andy Morgan and Chad Ritter as they endure the headaches, the heartbreaks, the strategies, the desires, all for the passion of the ultimate reward…checking one off of the hit list.

For more information on The Hit List presented by Moultrie, please visit www.thehitlistonline.com.

And for more please also go to: moultrie-1

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Gear Review: In Sights Nutrition – Buck Nut

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By: Bernie Barringer

By: Bernie Barringer

Each product or service is rated on Quality, Reliability, Price/Value, and Referability. Each area has an individual score, and creates an overall Trusted Review™.

I put out a 40-pound bag of In Sights Nutrition’s Buck Nut, also sold as Nut ‘N More, in a high-traffic deer area to test how they would respond to it. They really loved it and cleaned the entire pile up within a very short time.

Baiting deer is illegal in Minnesota so when I was asked to do a review of In Sights Nutrition’s Buck Nut, I had to think of how I could use it here. I decided to use it on a new hunting property I just acquired to inventory the deer there. My thoughts were as follows: if this stuff is attractive to deer, they will find it and allow me to get game camera photos of the population.

I set up a trail camera in a high-traffic area consisting of an intersection of deer trails. I poured out a 40-pound bag of the product on the ground in a heap. I felt that this would give me a week or two of looking over the deer on the property before it was gone.

I put out a 40-pound bag of In Sights Nutrition's Buck Nut, also sold as Nut N More, in a high-traffic deer area to test how they would respond to it. They really loved it and cleaned the entire pile up within a very short time.

I put out a 40-pound bag of In Sights Nutrition’s Buck Nut in a high-traffic deer area to test how they would respond to it. They really loved it and cleaned the entire pile up within a very short time.

To say it worked would be an understatement. I checked the trail camera only 48 hours later and the product was almost gone. I had more than 100 photos of does and fawns, foxes, raccoons, skunks, squirrels, and even a bear. Virtually every creature in the forest went nuts over this stuff. I had photos of one doe that came back to the product every four hours around-the-clock for two days! She was addicted. I did not get any photos of bucks, but I think since they have a larger home range, they simply didn’t get there in time. It has now been a week since I put the stuff out and the critters are digging holes in the ground and the area is torn to shreds where I piled the product.

Buck Nut is made primarily of peanuts, with a high fat and high sugar content. It comes in a 4-1/2-pound bucket, and is the same product that they provide to deer breeders labeled Nut N More. It is designed to cause captive deer to feed more heavily and serve as a supplement. I have no doubt that it works very well in that application, too.

We do not have hogs in this area, and what few turkeys are around weren’t in that area at the time, but I have no doubt that hogs would go bonkers over this stuff. I was really quite surprised at how much the deer went nuts over it.

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Quality

I guess the way to judge quality on a product that is made to attract deer is by how well the deer like it. There is no doubt that the deer loved this stuff, and they’d give it a very positive rating. It seems to be high in quality ingredients, with not a lot of filler. If I compare it to corn, which I have used in the past to get photos of area deer, I would say that this product clearly has a significantly higher attraction rate than corn.

Reliability

The doe that came back to the bait every four hours until it was gone pretty much sums up this category. Attracting deer is one thing, but bringing them back over and over, even in broad daylight, is another entirely. I run a lot of bear baits and one of the most important issues in bear baiting is getting them to consistently return to the bait site even when there are a lot of natural food sources around. This product does that with deer. Another factor in this equation was the fact that we had a huge mast crop this year and these deer were attracted to the product, despite the fact that the woods were full of acorns at the time I put it out. It rained really hard one of the days the product was out and that did not seem to adversely affect it at all.

Price/Value

This is the only weak spot in the product. At $16.99 for a 4-1/2-pound bucket, this stuff is quite spendy. Considering the rate at which deer munch through it, it could be a wallet buster. In my area, I can buy a 50-pound bag of corn for $10, so the In Sights products are significantly more costly. However, if you take into consideration the power of its attraction it gets a little easier to swallow. I think that if a guy thoroughly mixed a bucket of Buck Nut with a 50-pound bag of corn, you would have a pretty cost-effective deer magnet. That’s what I plan to do when I hunt in Kansas where baiting is legal this fall.

One other option is to get the 40-pound bags of Nut N More that is marketed to deer breeders. It’s the same stuff. They also have a similar product called Buck Draw which is more cost-efficient, it comes in 25-pound bags and sells for $18.99.

Referability

This one is easy. Would I recommend this product? You bet. Frankly I was very surprised at how well it worked. I think it would work most anywhere there are deer and you are feeding them for any one of three reasons: baiting, winter supplemental feeding, or bringing them in front of a game camera for a look at them. Good stuff.

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BUCK NUT: A specially formulated, industry leading peanut based powder supplement/attractant that that big bucks crave. Deer quickly become addicted to the flavor and nutrients found in BUCK NUT. As a supplement, BUCK NUT promotes better health in doe populations during and after conception, healthier fawns and bucks while also aiding in increased antler growth. As an attractant BUCK NUT has an enticing aroma that will draw deer in from long distances and keep them coming back for more.

Quality: 5 Stars
Reliability: 5 Stars
Price/Value: 3 Stars
Referability: 5 Stars
Trusted Review™ Scorecard
Average Score: 4.5 out of 5.0

Follow Bernie’s bowhunting adventures on his blog, bowhuntingroad.com.

“This article was originally published on OutdoorHub.com and is republished with permission.”

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Friendly Neighborhood Spider Mom

Remember the huge spider in my shower on June 5? It soon vanished and life went on until today, when while yanking a clean towel from my kitchen towel rack, the stacking kind of rack seen in hotel bathrooms, I was aghast to see tiny black crawling specks all over my clean white towel and the other folded towels. Hundreds of — what, ants? No, newborn spiders!

Quick inspection revealed their cottony white egg case, ruptured (see top center of the photo, a bit to the right; it looks like piece of popcorn), and when I pulled out more spider-infested towels, Mom Spider emerged, fled beneath the tea towels and tried to hide her enormous self, finally dropping to the floor and fleeing into the bathroom. I took all the towels from the rack and threw them into the washing machine with hot water and soap and returned to look for Mom, curled up at the base of the shower, unmoving. I thought because I’d just thrown her babies into my washer that she had died of grief, or else, like the storied Charlotte the spider, finished with reproduction she had no further business on earth. I scooped her up with a long-handled spoon. She clutched it, and I escorted her out of doors, where she is free to make as many babies as she wants.

But what a great choice she made for laying and nurturing her egg case, in a nice soft stack of clean kitchen towels, just outside the bathroom door! Good job, Ms. Wolf Spider! Meanwhile, as I write this, hundreds drown, and any who didn’t will roast in the dryer; I expect PETA at my door any minute.[ P.S., the spiders won this round! I washed all the towels without sorting them and now they’re all freakin’ pink.]

Calling ‘Em Out Of The Strut Zone

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Sponsored by, ThermaCELL, ACCESS Original Roll-Up Cover, and BowTube.com.

The group of gobblers and hens returned to the area on the opposite end of the field, where they went  under the fence and into the trees.  Twenty minutes later Fred (Lutger) and I noticed activity in the corn stubble field next to our field. The wind was blowing from us to the turkeys so I inserted the aluminum lid in my Commando Combo pot Call. I wanted the sound to carry extra far.  I ripped off half a dozen loud clucks.

Immediately, we heard multiple gobbles and in minutes 4 longbeards and a hen sashayed out of the trees and looked our way. Some other turkeys were still in the trees and dried grass.

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Two more hens promptly joined the group.

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I switched to yelps and purrs and one of the hens separated herself from the small group and started up hill, walking toward our decoys.

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One of the gobblers was a different strutter that had a feather missing fro its tail fan. This one was an Eastern gobbler and he put the moves on the other two hens.

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He tried his best to mate with one of the hens. They stayed around him for a couple of minutes and then pushed on and left him.

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Meanwhile, another Eastern, this one with an all “White Head” and  extra long beard, caught up to the 3rd hen and followed her.

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Good news! They were walking uphill and getting closer to our three decoys. I purred on the Commando and the White Head longbeard answered with a boisterous gobble. Straight away the other gobblers sounded off and started towards the “White Head”. I purred on the Commando and the hen gave a series of here I come type yelps.

Fred checked them with his Range Finder and whispered they were 34 yards away … and getting closer.

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The gobbler advanced slow but steady to 20 yards. I couldn’t resist it, I had to take one last picture of this unique gobbler.

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And then picked my bow up off the BowSticx Bow Bipod that holds my bow ready when I ground blind hunt and hooked my Fletch Hook on the string loop.

I looked back at the turkeys. The hen was almost to the hen decoy. White Head was closer yet, probably 15 yards.

I pulled my Chill R to full draw and put my top pin on the vitals … and triggered the release.

Whop !!!

The impact broke my arrow and the longer section of it caught my eye as it zipped of sharply the left. The arrow had walloped one of the blind’s carbon poles. It broke the shaft and went extremely off course.

White Head and the wild turkeys were as startled as I was.

They retreated at rocket speed to the area near the distant fence.

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CONTINUED…

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Charity Evaluator Issues Donor Advisory Warnings for HSUS

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charity1Charity Navigator, the nation’s largest and most-utilized evaluator of charities, has stripped their rating of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and other animal rights groups and replaced them with a “Donor Advisory” warning.

Charity Navigator rates organizations from one to four stars, with four being the highest rating possible. According to Charity Navigator, a “Donor Advisory” means that “serious concerns have been raised about this charity which prevents the issuance of a star rating.”

The move comes after Feld Entertainment, Inc., operator of the Ringling Brothers Circus, recovered $15.75 million in attorney fees from HSUS and their codefendants who include Born Free USA/Animal Protection Institute, Fund for Animals, Animal Welfare Institute, and the American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) as reported by USSA in early June.

Except for ASPCA, each of the codefendants also had their rating revoked.

Charity Navigator explains on their site that they take no position on the allegations made or issued by third parties. They follow that with “However, Charity Navigator has determined that the nature of this/these issue(s) warrants making this information available so that donors may determine for themselves whether such information is relevant to their decision whether to contribute to this organization.”

“I think the donor advisory issued for HSUS and the other groups by Charity Navigator speaks for itself,” said Nick Pinizzotto, USSA president and CEO. “Our focus is maintaining USSA Foundation as a first-class organization and our four star rating, which we know gives our supporters tremendous confidence in our work.”

While HSUS and others have fallen on the Charity Navigator scale, USSA Foundation recently earned the coveted four star rating from the organization.

“Our supporters can be fully confident that we manage our organization with the utmost integrity, which includes how we utilize the precious funding they provide,” said Pinizzotto. “We will continue to make decisions based upon sound science and will not allow ourselves to fall into the pit of extremism and propaganda that others can’t seem to avoid.”

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I Heart Judge Judy

According to Judge Judy, she has 10 million viewers every weekday and hers is the only show I’ll take an hour to watch (back-to-back episodes between 4 and 5 p.m.) and the only show I record so I never miss it, and the only reason I pay $35 a month for TV because I regularly watch nothing else now that Jay Leno’s off the air.

I know how much she’s hated, yet Her Honor fascinates me: a rude, clever, demanding woman skewering the scum of humanity: defaulters on loans, grabbers of steering wheels, owners of unleashed dogs, teenage drunks, no-show DJs, urban BB shooters, non-paying roommates, Craigslist creeps–smartasses of all ages. She’s part of what makes America great.

Yet Her Honor is not the whole show. I heart how much the real people look exactly like what they are! The sleaze has the posture, clothing, haircut, makeup, look, voice, facial expression of a sleaze. The skank, the rich suburban psycho, the ne’er-do-well father of 6 children by 4 women, the lazy laborer, or the swole-belly penny-ante landlord–all seem to look exactly like what they are. I’m especially enthralled when the plaintiffs and defendants are from Missouri. Okay, I’ve admitted it. I’ve watched for years. Years.

Hunting Bans Bad For Wildlife

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BANNER Sponsored by: HECS STEALTHSCREEN & ATSKO

By: Dr. Dave Samuel

By: Dr. Dave Samuel

On the surface, it would seem that if you stop hunting, animal numbers will go up. For example, what if we stopped hunting for white-tailed deer. For sure, numbers would increase for a while. Same for other big game species. But rabbit numbers and most small game animals, would see no change simply because hunting doesn’t impact their numbers. The average life expectancy for a cottontail is less than a year, with or without hunting. And there has been lots of research showing that hunting doesn’t impact many hunted species at all. Areas with dove hunting have same dove numbers as areas without hunting. Same for many other bird and mammal species.

But let’s get back to our deer example. With high deer numbers would come devastated habitat, unhealthy deer and a disaster waiting for the next bad winter. A major winter would put feet of snow on what little food remained and a massive deer die off would occur. For example, if we had cancelled deer seasons for North Dakota ten years ago and no EHD hit the herds, the past couple of winters would have devastated deer herds there. And this scenario is not fiction. There have been such situations where no deer hunting, followed by a bad winter, literally wiped out the deer in that area. Clearly, from a biological stand point, a hunting ban just doesn’t work.

But there are other considerations in my deer hunting ban example. The economics of hunting in America are pretty straight forward. Hunting license money is used for wildlife management. Hunting equipment federal excise taxes (11%) go to state wildlife agencies and must be used, along with license money, for wildlife management. So, stop deer hunting and you literally cripple your state wildlife agency and the law enforcement arm of that agency. Frankly, in America, such a large-scale ban on hunting would be a major disaster for all wildlife. Why? No money to manage wildlife. The antis can sugar coat that any way they want (and they do), but the end result is still the same. The billions hunters create do the job.

That’s America (and Canada). But they have a different hunting system in Africa and obviously different political situations as well. And in Africa we have some problems. They’ve had total country bans of hunting. In fact, Botswana just opted to eliminate most hunting and the future of wildlife there is really up in the air. Only time will tell, but there are some African examples that do make one wonder what the Botswana government is thinking about when they abolished hunting.

Recently our Fish and Wildlife Service made a terrible decision to stop the import of elephant trophies taken in Zimbabwe and Tanzania. Once announced, conservationists in America and Africa spoke out; presenting the reasons such a ban will hurt elephant populations. And this discussion isn’t a question of whether this ban will hurt elephant populations. All experts know that it will. No, this ban creates the situation of when and how badly elephants will suffer.

The safari hunter that took this great elephant, put thousands of dollars into the local and country economy.

The safari hunter that took this great elephant put thousands of dollars into the local and country economy.

(Even though poaching is taking a growing number of elephants in Zimbabwe, the ONLY way to generate funds is via elephant safaris. And the 500 or so harvested every year there is nothing compared to the thousands being poached. That is why this USFWS ban is so devastating and ill conceived.)

Though elephant numbers are declining in Zimbabwe, poaching, not hunting, is the reason and almost all anti-poaching resources are generated by safari hunting. In addition, “operation campfire” takes money from safaris and puts it into local villages. Hunters and those local communities are the number one deterrent of poaching.

In Tanzania each hunter pays a daily $150 conservation fee that keeps poaching scouts in the field. For the normal 21 day elephant hunt, that adds up to $3,150 per hunter, money that is used to stop poaching. The sad history is that in Africa hunting bans do not work.

Here are some examples. The most famous hunting ban in Africa took place when Kenya abolished it in 1977. After the ban, elephant numbers plummeted from 175,000 to 30,000 Black rhino numbers went from 8,000 to around 500. Some will argue that this decrease did not happen because hunting was stopped. They’ll note that poaching increased. OK, but when you stop hunting in Africa, poaching increases. Every time. It is the safari hunters, professional hunters and their scouts, plus the local villagers who benefit from safari hunting, that help keep the poachers out. When hunters are in the bush, poachers are less active there. It’s plain and simple.

Stop hunting and the money to keep the anti-poaching forces stops resulting in an increase of poaching.

Stop hunting and the money to keep the anti-poaching forces stops resulting in an increase of poaching.

Another hunting ban took place in Tanzania in 1973 when there were 380,000 elephants and 18,000 black rhinos. When hunting was reopened ten years later, elephant numbers were down to 80,000 and black rhino numbers were thought to be less than 100. Robin Hurt, famous conservationist and safari operator in Tanzania notes that after the ban was lifted, elephant numbers grew to 130,000 in 2009.

Since that time, poaching has increased dramatically and more funds (more than is provided via safari hunting) are needed to bring poaching down. The recent ban will do nothing to increase elephant numbers since safari hunting isn’t the problem. Poaching is.

Another ban took place in the Democratic Republic of Congo (you will recognize the former name of that country as Zaire) in 1984. There they have the forest elephant and although estimates are almost impossible to obtain due to the dense forest jungle, since the ban forest elephants are rare and white rhinos are gone.

Stop hunting. We’ve heard it and we’ll continue to hear it. Stop hunting sounds simple, but it is a complicated, negative policy for wildlife.

View all Dave’s Articles: Click Here

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Spypoint: Tiny-W3 Wireless Trail Camera System

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SPYPOINT® TINY-W3 WIRELESS TRAIL CAMERA SYSTEM

The Tiny-W3 camera system from Spypoint is an excellent choice for hunters who want to avoid disturbing their hunting spots because with the Tiny-W3 two unit system it is possible to view photos via the BLACKBOX™-D controller and remotely control the settings of the cameras. The transmission distance between the camera and the BLACKBOX™-D extends up to 500ft.

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It is also possible to combine up to 10 cameras to the BLACKBOX™ (additional TINY-PLUS cameras, sold separately). Each installed camera is identified differently in the BLACKBOX™, which greatly facilities the utilization.

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Tiny-W3 BLACKBOX-D

The SPYPOINT® TINY-W3 INVISIBLE LEDs trail camera captures 10-megapixel color photos by day and black-and-white photos at night and 10 to 90 seconds of High Definition (HD) video with sound. The Tiny-W3’s ultra-compact design (4.7 “W x 3.5″ H x 2.7″D) makes it easy to conceal anywhere. The camera has a sliding support to facilitate the handling. The 3 sensors covering a total of 7 zones will give you an ultra fast trigger speed and the distance detection sensor can be adjusted from 5′ to 65′.

The multi-shot mode allows up to 6 pictures per detection. Date, time, temperature (°C/°F), and moon phase can be stamped and printed on each photo. A removable SD/SDHC card (up to 32 GB, not included) is required to store images and footage from the TINY-W3, and is also required for the controller. Each unit has an incredible battery life when powered by 6 AA alkaline batteries and even longer when using the rechargeable lithium battery pack (sold separately). The charge of the lithium battery pack can be maintained using an optional solar panel. Each unit has a 12V/solar panel jack and the camera also has an external trigger jack. The following accessories are included: 2 installation straps, USB cable, audio-video cable and quick start guide.

Main features:

  •   Wireless photo transmission to BLACKBOX™-D (500 ft)
  •   Combine up to 10 cameras to a single BLACKBOX™-D
  •   View pictures and control all camera settings from the BLACKBOX™-D
  •   BLACKBOX™-D controller and backup system included
  •   Compatible with the REMOS™ technology
  •   3 sensors covering a total of 7 detection range zones
  •   10 Megapixels
  •   38 LEDs
  •   Invisible LEDs
  •   HD video with sound recording
  •   2.4″ viewing screen for each unit
  •   Ultra-tiny size: 4.7″ W x 3.5″ H x 2.7″ D

For more information on the Tiny-W3 and the complete line of trail and surveillance camera systems please go to: Spypoint

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